Tennis match-fixing: 'Tsunami' of corruption at lower levels says report

The report also contained numerous examples of how the TIU - which is funded by the sport's major stakeholders - should reform, be more accountable and improve its independence, including a move away from its current home at Roehampton, the same west London site where the ITF resides. For more information visit: Full list of BBC tennis commentaries. But it does not directly address the report's judgement the ATP "failed to exhaust potential leads before ending investigations". Accessibility links

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A group of whistle blowers inside tennis, who want to remain anonymous, recently passed the documents on to the BBC and Buzzfeed News.

We contacted Mark Phillips, one of the betting investigators in the enquiry, who told the BBC that they discovered repeated suspicious betting activity about a clear group. He has never spoken publicly about the material he gathered, which he said was as powerful as any he had seen in over 20 years as a betting investigator.

The BBC and Buzzfeed were also passed the names of other current players the TIU have repeatedly been warned about by betting organisations, sports integrity units and professional gamblers. Many of these players have been on the radar of the tennis authorities for involvement in suspicious matches going back to The BBC and Buzzfeed News have decided not to name the players because, without access to their phone, bank and computer records, it is not possible to determine whether they may have been personally taking part in match fixing.

However, tennis' integrity unit does have the power to demand all this evidence from any professional tennis player. The European Sports Security Association, which monitors betting for leading bookmakers, flagged up more than 50 suspicious matches to the TIU in The organisation declared that tennis attracts more suspicious gambling activity than other sport. While he welcomed the support of the betting industry, Nigel Willerton, director of the TIU, said "it is not the role of betting companies to make judgements about corrupt activity".

Eight of the players repeatedly flagged to the TIU over the past decade are due to play in the Australian Open which starts on Monday 18 January. They have a presence at between 20 and 30 tournaments a year, and their investigations over the past two years have resulted in seven players and one official being banned for between six months and a lifetime. Live Scores Results Calendar Video. Evidence of suspected match-fixing revealed By Simon Cox File on 4.

Zlatan scores th goal with incredible spinning volley 17 Sep From the section Football. Match-fixers 'should face life bans' 20 Jan From the section Tennis Read more on Tennis match-fixing: How to get into tennis. The best of this week's action. We contacted Mark Phillips, one of the betting investigators in the enquiry, who told the BBC that they discovered repeated suspicious betting activity about a clear group. He has never spoken publicly about the material he gathered, which he said was as powerful as any he had seen in over 20 years as a betting investigator.

The BBC and Buzzfeed were also passed the names of other current players the TIU have repeatedly been warned about by betting organisations, sports integrity units and professional gamblers. Many of these players have been on the radar of the tennis authorities for involvement in suspicious matches going back to The BBC and Buzzfeed News have decided not to name the players because, without access to their phone, bank and computer records, it is not possible to determine whether they may have been personally taking part in match fixing.

However, tennis' integrity unit does have the power to demand all this evidence from any professional tennis player. The European Sports Security Association, which monitors betting for leading bookmakers, flagged up more than 50 suspicious matches to the TIU in The organisation declared that tennis attracts more suspicious gambling activity than other sport.

While he welcomed the support of the betting industry, Nigel Willerton, director of the TIU, said "it is not the role of betting companies to make judgements about corrupt activity". Eight of the players repeatedly flagged to the TIU over the past decade are due to play in the Australian Open which starts on Monday 18 January. They have a presence at between 20 and 30 tournaments a year, and their investigations over the past two years have resulted in seven players and one official being banned for between six months and a lifetime.

Evidence of suspected match-fixing revealed By Simon Cox File on 4. Zlatan scores th goal with incredible spinning volley 17 Sep From the section Football. Match-fixers 'should face life bans' 20 Jan From the section Tennis Read more on Tennis match-fixing: How to get into tennis. The best of this week's action.